Archive for April, 2009

Sleeping Gene May Hold Key to HIV Prevention

An ongoing research has a hot topic among health experts as a long-dormant gene could hold the key in protecting humans from HIV. Nitya Venkataraman of the University of Central Florida has managed to reawaken a group of guardian genes called retrocyclins, which has been sleeping in our genomes for over 7 million years.  The retrocyclins enable monkeys to protect themselves from viruses similar to HIV and this research hopes that it can do the same for humans.  Several safety tests and clinical …

Fight Against Syphilis and AIDS Goes Online

A growing number of public health offices in the United States are beginning to register in social networking sites not to find friends, but to broaden their fight against syphilis, AIDS, and other sexually transmitted infections. The latest to open accounts on online meeting sites to battle STD are the public agencies in Ohio.The health department of Cleveland opened their own account on two sites, while Cincinnati has unveiled plans of online efforts in the coming months. Columbus Public Healt…

HIV Handicaps Itself to Escape Immune System Pressure

Like a lizard that lets go of its tail to escape from predators, research has found that there are various ways how HIV mutates and evolves in response to the pressure from the human immune system.  One of the observations shows that people with the rare ability of “beating” HIV for years tend to have HLA genes that help the immune system recognize and fight HIV more efficiently.  According to the report published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, a team of researchers from Emory Vaccine …

Scientists Film Spread of HIV for the First Time

A group of researchers has discovered how HIV is transferred from infected cells to healthy ones by capturing the process on film.  It is hoped that this previously unknown method of transfer will help fellow researchers create a vaccine to combat the virus that has caused the deaths of more than 25 million people.  The discovery was made possible by creating a molecular clone of HIV then inserting a protein into its genetic code which caused the virus to glow green when exposed to blue light.  …